Ah! the wonders of cream. Don’t you think it is so helpful to use in making delish dishes that delight your loved ones? Did you know that there are many different types of cream? You might have encountered some of them already in your recipes, or have seen them in supermarkets while shopping. Here are some common types of cream.


 

Whipping Cream: This cream is able to thicken and increase its volume when whipped. It is usually found in the chilled section of the supermarket as it cannot be stored in room temperature.

 

Heavy Whipping Cream: Heavy whipping cream is a thick cream that can hold up its shape or form well, as its volume doubles and it becomes denser when whipped. Heavy whipping cream is usually used for piping and decorating desserts.

 

Single Cream: It is a light cream that cannot be whipped or boiled, and is a richer alternative to milk. It is usually poured on fruits and puddings and used on soups, and sauces for your savory dishes.

 

Half and Half Cream: This cream is called its name for being half milk and half cream, and is usually added to coffee.

 

Crème Fraîche: Crème fraîche is a thick, heavy fresh cream that is treated with bacteria culture, giving it its tangy, nutty, slightly sour taste. Crème fraiche is usually used to thicken soups and stews, as well as salad dressings and curries because of its tangy taste.

 

Sour Cream: Sour cream is a fresh fermented cream, similar to crème fraîche, giving it that delish tangy sour taste. However, it is thinner than crème fraîche so it easily blends in with your dishes and has more of that sour taste. Sour cream is often used as a base to sauces and dressings, cakes, or used as-is as a dip.

 

All-Purpose Cream: True to its name, all-purpose cream is a flexible and versatile type of cream that can be used for both your savory and sweet creations. The cream is pourable at room temperature but is also able to be easily whipped when chilled.

 

 

NESTLÉ All Purpose Cream is your partner in cooking and creating creamy creations, whether for special occasions or everyday dining moments with family and friends. NESTLÉ All Purpose Cream has a delectable, creamy taste that noticeably enhances the flavor of food. Its consistency is just right, effectively coating every bit of fruit, meat and pasta, ensuring delightful taste in every bite.

 

It can be whipped to create swirls, dollops, and soft peaks to add excitement to your creamy delicious desserts, or poured and cooked with your favorite savory dishes to give it that dreamy and oh-so creamy taste and consistency.

 

You can even make homemade sour cream with NESTLÉ All Purpose Cream! Just add 1 tbsp of vinegar to a pack of NESTLÉ Cream and you’re good to go! Use it for dips, dressings, or as a base for cakes that call for sour cream.

 

In creating delightful dishes, it is great to use the No. 1 cream.

 

 

For your finest creamy specialties, there’s NESTLÉ Cream in can, the original cream in can from Nestlé loved by your moms and grandmoms! Imported from Brazil, it is the rich, premium, thicker* cream that can help you make your creamy dishes even more special and enjoyable. 

 

For recipes that call for a thicker consistency, such as cakes and mousses, NESTLÉ Cream can be chilled overnight to change its original and pourable consistency. NESTLÉ Cream also holds up well when simmered, helping enrich your savory dishes to make them creamier and extra delightful.

 

The next time you encounter cream in your recipe, you can whip out this guide to see how NESTLÉ  Cream can help you in making that creamy creation. So what are you waiting for? Start creating with cream.

 *thicker than NESTLÉ All Purpose Cream

 

 

REFERENCES:

http://www.culturesforhealth.com/how-to-make-sour-cream
http://theepicentre.com/ingredient/cream-types-of-cream-and-their-uses/
http://www.legendairy.com.au/dairy-foods/dairy-products/cream     
http://whatscookingamerica.net/Sauces_Condiments/CremeFraiche.htm
http://www.joyofbaking.com/CremeFraiche.html
http://www.thekitchn.com/whats-the-difference-clotted-c-87144
http://www.thekitchn.com/whats-the-difference-halfandha-73203
http://theepicentre.com/ingredient/cream-types-of-cream-and-their-uses/
http://homecooking.about.com/od/milkproducts/a/sourcreamwhatis.htm
http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/glossary/cream
http://www.thekitchn.com/5-good-uses-for-half-and-half-80489